TidesofJulie

Thrashing, rolling, everchanging
~ Wednesday, April 16 ~
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Tags: alan watts
~ Monday, April 7 ~
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Let’s put it this way. Say you’ve got really serious art, and it takes really hard work, whether it’s painting or music or literature. That stuff’s not fun in the way commercial entertainment is fun. I mean fun — like eating a Twinkie. It’s like slipping into a warm bath after a hard day. It’s an escape. It’s a relaxation. And that’s fine, and that’s entirely appropriate. The danger comes when the escape becomes the overriding purpose. And one of the ways it seems that television has affected me is that my expectation for the amount of fun and pleasure to work — that ratio is very different than they are for my parents. I think my pain threshold is lower. My expectations are higher. My level of resentment at having to do anything I don’t particularly want to do that isn’t pleasurable is higher. I think a certain amount of that comes from the fact that for six hours a day I receive certain messages — you know, ‘relax, we’re going to give to you, you don’t have to give anything back, all you need to do is every so often go and buy this product.’ But animals have fun. My dogs play. And watching them play — there’s a purity of intent and a lack of self-consciousness that I wish I could achieve when I was experiencing pleasure. But Plato and John Stuart Mill both take books to talk about different types of pleasure. In my own personal life, I like really arty stuff a lot of the time. But there’s also times I watch an enormous amount of TV, and I’ve read probably 70 percent of Stephen King’s books. And I’ve read them basically because for a little while I want to forget that my name is David Wallace, you know, and that I have limitations, and that I’m sad that my girlfriend yelled at me. I think serious art is supposed to make us confront things that are difficult in ourselves and in the world. And one of the dangers is if we get conditioned to confront less and less and experience more and more pleasure, the commercial stuff’s gonna win out.
— from a 1997 interview with David Foster Wallace by David Wiley (via slothnorentropy)

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~ Saturday, April 5 ~
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God and I are like two fat people in a tiny boat,
we keep bumping into each other and laughing.
— Hafiz (via tobiji)

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reblogged via mojominx
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Tasha Tudor’s Valentine

Tasha Tudor’s Valentine

Tags: Tasha Tudor Valentines Illustration Botanical
Permalink Tags: Mark Twain conservatory
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ryanishka:

Anna Pavlova and her pet swan, Jack, circa 1905

ryanishka:

Anna Pavlova and her pet swan, Jack, circa 1905


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reblogged via ohsoromanov
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Asters—sweltering days,
old entreaty, spell,
the gods shed timid rays,
an hour upon the scale.

Once more the golden flocks,
the sky, the light, the veil.
What breeds the familiar flux
of wings before they fail?

Once more now the lust,
the rush of roses, and you—
the summer’s leaned to watch
the swallows skirt the dew,

and once more does not falter,
sure dark precedes new light:
the swallows drink the water
and fade into the night.

"Asters" after the German of Gottfried Benn (1886-1956)

translated by Leo Yankevich
Tags: Asters Gottfried Ben Leo Yankevich
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Laurits Tuxen Le mariage de l’empereur Nicolas II et la Grande Princesse Alexandra Fiodorovna (1894)

Laurits Tuxen Le mariage de l’empereur Nicolas II et la Grande Princesse Alexandra Fiodorovna (1894)

Tags: Laurits Tuxen Romanov
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Beatrix Potter

Beatrix Potter

Tags: Beatrix Potter Tom Kitten jemima puddle-duck
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Anna Pavlova—The Dying Swan

Tags: ballet Anna Pavlova The Dying Swan
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~ Friday, April 4 ~
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I’m making a lot of friends in the garden, and the lavender has just started to bloom. My chamomile had to be repotted, and the lemongrass was withering this morning. I’ve placed them in the shade for now, and they seem to be doing quite well. I’ve already harvested some parsley, and it’s drying in my cabinet as we speak. Quite happy so far. 


~ Wednesday, March 26 ~
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beingblog:

“There is in Celtic mythology the notion of ‘thin places’ in the universe where the visible and the invisible world come into their closest proximity. To seek such places is the vocation of the wise and the good — and for those that find them, the clearest communication between the temporal and eternal. Mountains and rivers are particularly favored as thin places marking invariably as they do, the horizontal and perpendicular frontiers. But perhaps the ultimate of these thin places in the human condition are the experiences people are likely to have as they encounter suffering, joy, and mystery.”
Peter Gomes from Sarah Blanton’s lovely meditation on thin places on the waters of Tennessee.

beingblog:

“There is in Celtic mythology the notion of ‘thin places’ in the universe where the visible and the invisible world come into their closest proximity. To seek such places is the vocation of the wise and the good — and for those that find them, the clearest communication between the temporal and eternal. Mountains and rivers are particularly favored as thin places marking invariably as they do, the horizontal and perpendicular frontiers. But perhaps the ultimate of these thin places in the human condition are the experiences people are likely to have as they encounter suffering, joy, and mystery.”

Peter Gomes from Sarah Blanton’s lovely meditation on thin places on the waters of Tennessee.


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lyriumnug:

skyrim + these fucking flowers

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reblogged via luna-patchouli
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reblogged via realmedieval